Tag Archives: gbd

Digging into the GBD 2010 Risk Factors II

A follow-up on my recent adventure digging into the GBD 2010 risk factors, wherein I helped a fellow researcher find the specific diseases to which the risk factor DALYs are attributed (http://ihmeuw.org/2c6v ):

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I helped find where to look at the risk factor attribution, but what if you want to download the numbers? The “download chart data as CSV” link gives you something, but it is not the risk factors, it is just the disease fractions of total DALYs:

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Fortunately, a javascript guru with a few minute told me the incantation to get the risk factor fractions out, recorded here for posterity:

$.fileDownload(app.settings.baseURL+'php/risk_data.php',{ httpMethod: "POST", data:{ measure: app.getMeasure(1, 'percent'), sex: app.getSex(1), age: app.getAge(1), year: app.getYear(1), location: app.getLocation(1), cause: d3.keys(app.metadata.causes), risk: app.getRisk(1), format: 'csv', title: app.charts[1].getTitle(), } });

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Digging into GBD 2010 Risk Factors

I have to make the old DisMod-III website disappear (is it still here?). It is beautiful, but it is not available, and so I have to turn away researchers who want to use it for their own work. Fortunately, I can send them to a GitHub repository of DisMod code that they can use. But recently, it was not really DisMod that the emailing researcher wanted. I think they were really interested in digging into the details behind a figure like this one:
rf

For that, there is a non-dead website I can offer: GBD Compare. Finding your way around it can be a bit of a challenge, though, so here is a link straight to the relative contribution of each nutritional risk factor for Germany and USA: http://ihmeuw.org/2c6t ; to see from which specific diseases the risk factor DALYs are attributed, you can use a different part of this tool, linked to here: http://ihmeuw.org/2c6v

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GBD 2010: The Global Burden of Ischemic Heart Disease in 1990 and 2010: The Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study

I wish I had been more diligent in collecting the disease-specific papers that have come out following the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study… here is the latest one to go into print: Moran et al, The Global Burden of Ischemic Heart Disease in 1990 and 2010: The Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, in Circulation.

ihd_compartments

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IHME data in Economist viz

I had two colleagues call my attention to a cool use of GBD 2010 estimates recently: the Economist observed World Hepatitis Day by calling attention to the deaths due to hepatitis as compared to the deaths due to HIV. It is very nice to see these numbers getting out into the world.

But there are a lot of metrics to use for this comparison, and a lot of ways to show them besides a four-colored map. Find a country of interest from their map, and then make a detailed comparison on the GBD-Compare tool: China, North Africa/Middle East, United States.

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GBD Country-level Visualizations

Very cool new visualizations of the GBD2010 results are now on-line: http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd-compare/

#GBD2010

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The GBD 2010 Health Measurement Survey is here

Have you got 15 minutes for science? Take this strange survey that I’ve been excited about for the last two years. I’ve been calling it the Disability Weights Survey, but now that it’s all professionally implemented and communications-department approved, it is officially the GBD 2010 Health Measurement Survey.

The survey is part of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 led by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, in collaboration with four other leading institutions: Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Queensland, and the World Health Organization.

Our goal is to collect responses from at least 50,000 people worldwide. Please consider sharing this and encouraging participation within your organization. In addition, we would ask you to consider forwarding information about this survey to colleagues and contacts outside your organization who might be interested in participating.

The survey takes about 15 minutes to complete. Participation is completely voluntary and anonymous. In the near future, we hope to translate the survey into additional languages.

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Population Health in Iran

The political situation in Iran has been in the news and on the nets a lot this week. I hope that the friends and families of all my Iranian colleagues are safe. I’m thinking of you.

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