Monthly Archives: December 2014

Introducing Smudge

I had an inspiration to make something a couple weeks ago for #MakeSomethingDay (the productive alternative to #BuyNothingDay). It is a finger-painting app that neighborhood kids have been enjoying. http://bl.ocks.org/aflaxman/a31763011f9da46fc6d2

sascha's beautiful picture

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Filed under dataviz

DB1B

I learned about a “big” data source for understanding air travel at the eScience incubator project talks last week, the DB1B database, aka the Airline Origin and Destination Survey. This is a 10% sample of all tickets for flights originating in the US, released quarterly since the 1993: http://www.transtats.bts.gov/DL_SelectFields.asp?Table_ID=289&DB_Short_Name=Origin%20and%20Destination%20Survey This must be good for something in global health.

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Filed under general

IHME Seminar: Social Networks for Policy Change by Jessica Shearer

Speaking of cool IHME seminars, last month we heard one on a social network analysis of the health policy actors involved in national-level policy change. So cool: http://www.healthdata.org/video/policy-development-integrated-community-case-management-iccm-national-and-global-levels-mixed

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Filed under global health

IHME Seminar: Infectious Disease Mapping with Simon Hay

I used to keep up so well with the weekly IHME seminars on this blog. They are still weekly, but now they come too fast for me to capture… I guess it’s me.

There have been a few recently that really need to be mentioned, however, such as last week’s presentation on mapping *all* infectious diseases globally. Audacious project by Simon Hay: http://www.healthdata.org/video/mapping-global-distribution-all-infectious-disease

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Filed under disease modeling

Reproducible Research Hackathon

There is an interesting project to develop a curriculum for teaching reproducible research starting that I heard about recently: https://github.com/Reproducible-Science-Curriculum/Reproducible-Science-Hackathon-Dec-08-2014

I have been thinking about how much of this reproducible research stuff is domain-specific. This crowd seems like they are doing something pretty different from me for their research, so hope to find out how much of their reproduciblity works in global health metrics applications. A lot of interesting topics already in their issue tracker: https://github.com/Reproducible-Science-Curriculum/Reproducible-Science-Hackathon-Dec-08-2014/issues

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Filed under education

Gates Foundation and Open Access

This news crossed my desk recently, about the Gates Foundation pushing forward open access (OA) in 2015:

Interesting local OA news, although not UW of course. The Gates Foundation is implementing a OA mandate as of January 1, 2015:

http://www.gatesfoundation.org/how-we-work/general-information/open-access-policy

It’s a very progressive and strong policy. No opt-out, no embargo, no restricted access, etc. I like the open data element, which is also a step beyond typical OA policies, and relevant to reproducibility.

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Filed under global health

Close Enough for Scientific Work

This Software Carpentry project to find out how people are testing their scientific code looks great: http://software-carpentry.org/blog/2014/11/close-enough-for-scientific-work.html

I’ll have to keep my eye on the associated GitHub page https://github.com/swcarpentry/close-enough-for-scientific-work

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Filed under software engineering