Long tables, cold coffee, and late nights

Sherry Turkle: https://www.uni.edu/provost/sites/default/files/u29/how_to_teach_in_an_age_of_distraction_-_the_chronicle_of_higher_education.pdf

Reminds me of the math cafes of Poland pre-WWII that I read about. That sounded so fun to me when I was a student.

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2016 Stephen Stewart Gloyd Endowed lecture: Sanjay Basu

Dr. Sanjay Basu gave the 2016 Stephen Stewart Gloyd Endowed lecturer on May 19, 2016. He spoke on the challenges and importance of measuring the health impact of government programs and policies. The Stephen Stewart Gloyd Endowed Lecture was established in 1982 to recognize Dr. Park Willis Gloyd. The lectureship was renamed by the family to recognize Park’s son, Stephen Gloyd, who is the Associate Chair for Education and Curriculum for the UW Department of Global Health, and a professor in Health Services at the School of Public Health.

Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Stanford University. He is a primary care physician and an epidemiologist, focusing on the study of how population health is influenced by social and economic programs. Dr. Basu received his education from MIT, Oxford, and Yale, and serves on advisory panels for the United Nations, World Health Organization, the American Heart Association, and the Global Burden of Disease Project. In 2013, he was named one of the “top 100 global thinkers” by Foreign Policy Magazine, and in 2015 he won the New Innovator Award from the Director of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Basu is the co-author of “The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills,” which discusses recessions, budget battles, and the politics of life and death.

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Learning in Surgeons

New paper: Assessing surgeon behavior change after anastomotic leak in colorectal surgery
Authors
Vlad V Simianu, Anirban Basu, Rafael Alfonso-Cristancho, Richard C Thirlby, Abraham D Flaxman, David R Flum
Publication date
2016/10/31
Journal
Journal of Surgical Research
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022480416301962

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Paper with Cool Method

Investigating the remuneration of health workers in the DR Congo: implications for the health workforce and the health system in a fragile setting
Maria Paola Bertone, Gregoire Lurton and Paulin Beya Mutombo
http://heapol.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/01/11/heapol.czv131.abstract

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Big Data Science resources

• The Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) and Library are pleased to announce the release of open educational resources (OERs) in the area of Biomedical Big Data Science. Funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Program, OERs have been produced that can be downloaded, used, and repurposed for a variety of educational audiences by both learners and educators. Development of the OERs is an ongoing process, but they have reached the point where a critical mass of the content is being made available for use and to obtain feedback. The OERs are intended to be flexible and customizable and their use or repurpose is encouraged. They can be used as “out of the box” courses for students or as materials for educators to use in courses, training programs, and other learning activities. The goal is to create 32 module topics. Currently, 20 of the modules are available for download and use. For additional information, contact Bill Hersh at: hersh@ohsu.edu.

Also all on GitHub: https://github.com/OHSUBD2K/

I want to see this one: BDK32 Displaying Confidence and Uncertainty

it doesn’t exist yet, so I have to remember to check back when it does.

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Makes sense to me

Knowing When and How to Use Medical Products
A Shared Responsibility for the FDA and CMS
http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2580955

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Philip Stark on “Preproducibility”

A lot of sensible advice here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHryMtEBkB4

A combination of Dr. Stark’s name and the recent time I’ve spend absorbing the Marvel Comic Universe through Luke Cage [link] led to a culture insight, though. Some of my favorite superheros’ origin would have me believe that irreproducible research is shortest path to greatness. Maybe not for the (usually evil) scientist, but still.

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